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How To Read Literature Like a

Topic: Literature

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All ghosts and vampires are never only ghosts and vampires . There's a thin line between the ordinary and the monstrous. Vampirism is beyond just vampires. More so, selfishness, exploitation, a refusal to respect the autonomy of other people. Seeing this situation in The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, was a connection between the two. The novel opens with Hester, the protagonist, being led to the scaffold where she is to be publicity shamed for having commited adultery. Hester is forced to wear the letter "A" on her gown at all times. Hester wearing the scarlet letter "A" is a perfect example of exploitation. A major theme is sin, relating easily to the evilness of sex in a puritan society. Tiesha Freeman P.2 The ongoing interactions between poems or stories which deepens reading adding multiple levels of meaning to a work, defines interexulity. Being that there's no such thing as a wholly piece of work in literature helps me to indicate that an...

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